AAAR 37th Annual Conference

Tutorials Information

Session 1: 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM

TS1

Introduction to Aerosols 1: Particle Aerodynamics, Diffusion, and Size Measurement


Abstract: This tutorial is the first of two that introduce the broad field of aerosol science. We begin with the behavior of individual particles to understand how they behave in the environment, and the physical principles on which most aerosol measurements are based. The drag forces that act on a particle determine its settling velocity and whether it is able to follow the flow of a gas. Several different models describe the drag forces: Stokes law applies for spherical particles moving at modest velocities, though a slip correction must be introduced to account for non-continuum effects for particles small compared to the mean-free-path of the gas molecules. Other corrections are required if the velocity becomes large enough the fluid inertia affects the motion. Knowledge of these scaling principles makes it possible to relate particle behavior in seemingly disparate systems, and make it possible to determine particle size. The drag forces also determine Brownian motion, and, hence, affect their deposition and losses in the respiratory tract, in sampling systems, and in filters, causing aerosol filtration to be more effective than filtration of particles from liquid media. We will briefly look at how this aerodynamic behavior is employed in determining particle size in a wide range of instruments, including the migration of charged particles in mobility analyzers.

Richard Flagan


Bio: Richard C. Flagan is the Irma and Ross McCollum/William H. Corcoran Professor of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He has served as President of the AAAR and Editor-in-Chief of Aerosol Science and Technology. His research spans the field of aerosol science, including atmospheric aerosols, aerosol instrumentation, aerosol synthesis of nanoparticulate materials, and bioaerosols. His many contributions to the field of aerosol science have been acknowledged with the Smoluchowski Award, the Sinclair Award, and the Fuchs Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering.
Email: flagan@caltech.edu

 

TS2

Soft Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Principles, Best Practices, and Applications to Aerosol Research


Abstract: Atmospheric organic aerosol is a complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds and therefore presents a substantial analytical challenge. Organic aerosol composition can be studied using on-line and off-line soft ionization high resolution mass spectrometry methods. Since a mass spectrometer measures only the introduced ion beam, a focus on the strengths and weaknesses of the major ionization methods, including key lab and field results, will be discussed. Techniques that will be highlighted include electrospray ionization, extractive electrospray ionization, chemical ionization, and atmospheric pressure photoionization. Next, methods for accurate mass measurements will be discussed, including mass resolution, internal mass recalibration, and peak deconvolution. Current methods for calibrating and quantifying ion signals in soft ionization mass spectra will also be presented. Finally, the post-processing methods for ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry measurements will be discussed, including noise estimation, isotope filtering, mass recalibration, and molecular formula assignment. Examples, from an open-source R package, MFAssignR, with a full set of these post-processing tools will be provided. Background information and the R code for MFAssignR can be found in the public GitHub repository (https://github.com/ChARM-Group/MFAssign).

Lynn Mazzoleni


Bio: Dr. Mazzoleni is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and the Co-Director of the Chemical Advanced Resolution Methods (ChARM) Laboratory at Michigan Tech. She received her Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences and Health from the University of Nevada, Reno in 2005. Dr. Mazzoleni has worked at the Desert Research Institute, Colorado State University, and Los Alamos National Laboratory before becoming a professor at Michigan Tech. Her primary research interests are focused on the identification of organic aerosol constituents from various atmospheric environments with a special interest in biomass combustion and aqueous phase chemistry. Dr. Mazzoleni's research group uses a combination of advanced mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and data science methods for a discovery-centered approach to identify organic molecules in atmospheric complex mixtures. She is the recipient of several national awards, including a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award for a research-focused sabbatical at the Italian National Center for Research in Bologna, Italy.
Email: lrmazzol@mtu.edu

Manjula Canagaratna


Bio: Manjula Canagaratna is an associate center director of the Center for Aerosol and Cloud Chemistry at Aerodyne Research (ARI) in Billerica, MA. She received her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of Minnesota and completed a post-doctoral chemistry fellowship at MIT. Dr. Canagaratna’s work at ARI focuses on the development and application of advanced mass spectrometric techniques for the study of gas and particulate species in the atmosphere. She has participated in many field and laboratory experiments using ARI's aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) systems. In addition, she has focused on the use of multivariate analysis methods for analysis of AMS/CIMS spectra with the particular focus of obtaining improved chemical information about organic aerosol species.
Email: mrcana@aerodyne.com

 

TS3

Introduction to Environmental Chambers: Approaches and Challenges


Abstract: Environmental chambers are widely used to study atmospheric chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. While very useful for these studies, the presence of chamber surfaces presents a unique set of experimental challenges. This tutorial will explore the historical development of chambers (static and flow), the role of surfaces in influencing the chemistry within the chamber, and how these effects are characterized and accounted for within such experiments. Chamber quality control experiments including assessment of low-NOx experimental conditions, wall loss, particle background, particle-gas-wall interactions, HONO release, and implications for kinetic and aerosol modeling will be discussed.

David Cocker


Bio: Coming soon!

 

TS4

Quantifying Aerosol Exposure


Abstract: Quantifying aerosol exposure is important for many applications, including supporting epidemiology studies, risk assessments, development of mitigation strategies, and sustainability efforts for cities and communities. This tutorial will review current measurement and modeling methods for estimating aerosol exposure in non-industrial indoor and in-cabin microenvironments, such as homes, schools, hospitals, commercial buildings, and vehicles. In this tutorial, we will discuss existing as well as promising future approaches for quantifying aerosol exposure. There will be multiple real-world examples as well as a hands-on activity.

Andrea Ferro


Bio: Andrea Ferro is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Clarkson University, the Clarkson Institute for a Sustainable Environment Associate Director for Research, a faculty affiliate of the Clarkson Center for Air Resources Engineering and Science (CARES), and the current Vice President of AAAR. Her technical expertise is focused on indoor air quality and human exposure to aerosols. She has worked directly with communities, schools, and hospitals and to measure, understand and mitigate sources of PM exposure. She has been conducting research in the field of particle resuspension for more than 20 years, including measurement and modeling of particle adhesion, detachment and transport at multiple scales, as well as the quantification of human exposure to resuspended particles for various exposure scenarios.
Email: aferro@clarkson.edu

Ellison Carter


Bio: Ellison Carter is an assistant professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Colorado State University. Her technical expertise is focused on indoor air quality and human environmental exposures in residential environments. She has conducted field-based studies nationally and internationally in rural and urban settings to evaluate patterns and predictors of air pollution exposures. This work is frequently in collaboration with interdisciplinary teams including social and health scientists, as well as clinicians, chemists, and building scientists. Her work in this field of research includes measurement of stationary indoor and outdoor air pollution, as well as personal exposure monitoring, and assessments of housing quality.
Email: Ellison.Carter@colostate.edu

 

Session 2: 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM

TS5

Introduction to Aerosols 2: The Particle Size Distribution and Its Dynamics


Abstract: This tutorial continues the basic introduction to aerosol science. In this session we focus on developing the tools to describe the dynamics of aerosol populations. An aerosol is an ensemble of particles in a gas, and the particles are distributed over a range of sizes. Therefore, they must be represented by a particle size distribution. We will discuss the representation of aerosol populations as size distributions, their graphical representation, and models such as the log normal-distribution. Condensation and evaporation of volatile species onto particles determines their growth in the atmosphere, and efficient counting of particles too small to detect optically in condensation particle counters. Both continuum and non-continuum effects must again be considered, as must the surface tension which governs particle activation, initial activation, and the possibility of nucleating new particles from the vapor phase. These processes also alter the shape of the size distribution. Particle-particle collisions lead to coagulation, which further alters the size distribution. We will examine how these diverse processes are combined to describe the population dynamics for aerosol systems.

Richard Flagan


Bio: Richard C. Flagan is the Irma and Ross McCollum/William H. Corcoran Professor of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He has served as President of the AAAR and Editor-in-Chief of Aerosol Science and Technology. His research spans the field of aerosol science, including atmospheric aerosols, aerosol instrumentation, aerosol synthesis of nanoparticulate materials, and bioaerosols. His many contributions to the field of aerosol science have been acknowledged with the Smoluchowski Award, the Sinclair Award, and the Fuchs Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering.
Email: flagan@caltech.edu

 

TS6

Sensor Data Science Bootcamp


Abstract: The recent proliferation of low-cost aerosol and gas sensors has sparked much interest among the scientific community. Such devices show promise to enable measurements at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales, which, in turn, can lead to the creation of distributed sensor networks to support both traditional research and community-based research. With these exciting prospects, however, come challenges of sensor performance, sensor reliability, and data management. This tutorial will review basic principles of statistics and data science for real-time aerosol sensors, with a focus on low-cost (<$2,000) devices. Topics to be covered will include data management and cleaning, exploratory data analysis, linear models, troubleshooting techniques (and potential solutions), statistical issues relevant to time-series data (such as autocorrelation), and determination of analytic figures of merit (e.g., accuracy, bias, prevision, limit of detection). Participants need not have formal training in data science beforehand; self-help resources for learning basic data science in the R and MATLAB programming languages will be provided.

Josh Apte


Bio: Dr. Josh Apte is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He studies human exposure to air pollution in the built environment to understand the relationships between emissions, atmospheric transformations, concentrations, human exposures and health effects. His work is interdisciplinary and draws methods from environmental engineering, aerosol science, exposure assessment, and environmental health, with the goal of applying these insights to designing healthy, energy-efficient, and sustainable cities for the world. His research on air pollution mapping using Google Street View Cars has won numerous awards and has garnered both national and international attention for impact. His paper “High-Resolution Air Pollution Mapping with Google Street View Cars: Exploiting Big Data” won the “Top Environmental Technology Paper” award from Environmental Science and Technology in 2017.
Email: jsapte@utexas.edu

John Volckens


Bio: Dr. John Volckens is a professor of Mechanical Engineering and the Director of the Center for Energy Development and Health at Colorado State University (CSU). He holds affiliate appointments in Environmental Health, Biomedical Engineering, the Colorado School of Public Health, and the CSU Energy Institute. His research interests involve air quality, low-cost sensors, exposure science, and air pollution-related disease. He is a founding member of the CSU Partnership for Air Quality, Climate, and Health – an organization that seeks to develop practical, science-vetted solutions to intertwined problems of air quality, climate, and health that we face as a society. He holds a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Vermont and MS, PhD degrees in Environmental Engineering from the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He then went on to a Postdoctoral position at the U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC. At CSU, he has pioneered the development of several new pollution sensor technologies, which have been deployed for public health research in over 30 different countries and as far away as the International Space Station. He has published over 100 manuscripts related to exposure science, aerosol technology, and air pollution-related disease.
Email: John.Volckens@colostate.edu

 

TS7

Designing and conducting field campaigns that include indoor environments


Abstract: Health effects from particulate exposures are well understood from the context of outdoor air. People, however, spend more than 90% of their time indoors and sources and levels of exposures can vary widely compared to outdoor air. The driving factors in indoor particle concentrations stem from the outdoor environment, the building itself (e.g., the leakiness of the enclosure), the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in the building (e.g., the amount of outside air), and the activities of the occupants in the building (e.g., the temporal profile of indoor sources). All of these factors can be very different, even in seemingly similar buildings, and highly temporally variable in the same building. In this workshop we will review the key ingredients needed to include indoor environments in any field study. We will outline a two-step process for first selecting the building parameters that are important to measure depending on the goals of a field study and then to efficiently make measurements of these variables depending on the needed resolution and resources available. The tutorial is targeted at researchers with expertise in outdoor aerosol and air quality measurements and/or exposure assessments.

Shelly Miller


Bio: Shelly L. Miller, Ph.D., is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and faculty in the Environmental Engineering Program at the University of Colorado Boulder. She holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from University of California, Berkeley and a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Harvey Mudd College. Dr. Miller teaches about and investigates urban air quality and works diligently to understand the impact of air pollution on public health and the environment. She has published over 60 peer reviewed articles on air quality, authored a Chapter on Indoor Air Quality in the Environmental Engineering Handbook, is an active scientist on twitter, and publishes open access as often as possible.
Email: Shelly.Miller@colorado.edu

Jeff Siegel


Bio: Jeffrey Siegel, Ph.D., is a Professor of Civil and Mineral Engineering at the University of Toronto and a member of the university’s Building Engineering Research Group. He holds joint appointments at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley as well as a B.Sc. from Swarthmore College. He is fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the Academy of Fellows of ISIAQ, and an associate editor for the journal Building and Environment. His research interests including control of indoor particulate matter, healthy and sustainable buildings, ventilation and indoor air quality in residential and commercial buildings, the indoor microbiome, and moisture interactions with indoor chemistry and biology. He teaches courses in indoor air quality, sustainable buildings, and sustainable energy systems. He has conducted indoor air quality and energy conservation research in over two thousand residential and commercial buildings.
Email: jeffrey.siegel@utoronto.ca

 

TS8

Data Inversion for Aerosol Science and Technology

Abstract: Many aerosol measurement techniques produce raw measurement response functions that must be inverted to properly interpret the data. This tutorial will introduce common inversion approaches used in Aerosol Science & Technology. One often used technique is mobility classification of aerosol using electrical mobility analyzers. The tutorial will provide hands-on examples for several instrument configurations. The examples are designed to demonstrate how the inversion of mobility analyzer response functions is critical to informing experimental design and data analysis. At the end of the session, tutorial participants will have a starting point to modify supplied computer code for use in their own research projects.

Markus Petters


Bio: Markus Petters is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marine Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University. He received a doctorate in Atmospheric Science from the University of Wyoming and was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. His research interests include aerosol instrumentation and the study of aerosol phase transitions in the laboratory and field setting. He was co-recipient of the AAAR Kenneth T. Whitby Award in 2015.
Email: markus_petters@ncsu.edu

 

Session 3: 1:00 PM - 2:40 PM

TS9

Aerosol Measurements with Microfluidics


Abstract: Microfluidics is a powerful platform for precise, high-throughput, low-cost measurements with small volumes of sample. The microscale platform is already widely established in fields of biology, medicine, chemistry, and rheology, and, as highlighted in this tutorial, is rapidly emerging as important platform for aerosol science measurements. This tutorial on aerosol measurements with microfluidics will involve three main sections:

  1. Basic operating principles of microfluidic flows, with emphasis on two-phase flows for aerosol science applications. General techniques for generating, detecting, trapping, sorting, filtering, and manipulating droplets and particles in microscale flows will be presented.
  2. Current and emerging aerosol science microfluidic measurements, with comparison to conventional aerosol experimental methods where applicable. In addition, methods for sample collection will be discussed.
  3. Step-by-step guidance on designing, fabricating, and operating devices, with a practical hands-on demonstration of assembling a device and generating two phase flows.
Cari Dutcher


Bio: Cari S. Dutcher is the Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, with research interests in aerosol science and multiphase fluids. Cari currently serves on the AAAR board of directors. She has received a number of early faculty awards, including the 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, NSF CAREER, McKnight Land-Grant Professorship, and AAAR Kenneth T. Whitby Award. Cari received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in Chemical Engineering and was a postdoc at the University of California, Davis in the Air Quality Research Center.
Email: cdutcher@umn.edu

 

TS10

Combustion Synthesis of Materials: How to closely control product aerosol particle characteristics


Abstract: We begin with the fascinating history of aerosol technology from production of inks in ancient China to the Bible printing by Gutenberg and to the manufacture of optical fibers, carbon blacks, pigments, fumed silica, filamentary nickel and nanosilver today. Advantages and disadvantages of aerosol over conventional technologies for material synthesis are presented. Flame aerosol reactors are highlighted for their proven scalability as they dominate by value and volume the manufacture of aerosol-made materials today. The significance of high temperature particle residence time, self-preserving particle size distribution and power laws for fractal-like particle structure in multi-scale (continuum, mesoscale and molecular dynamics) aerosol reactor design is presented. Basic design principles for synthesis of nanoparticles with closely controlled primary size and structure (from ramified or fractal-like to perfectly spherical particles) are introduced. Distinct examples are given with selected process variables such as reactant flowrates, concentration, composition, mixing, doping, charging and pressure. Opportunities for aerosol synthesis of functional films and particles for biomaterials, catalysts and gas sensors by combustion of sprayed solutions are presented.

Sotiris E. Pratsinis


Bio: Sotiris is professor of process engineering and materials science at ETH Zurich teaching mass transfer, introduction to nanoscale engineering and micro-nano-particle technology (http://www.ptl.ethz.ch/people/person-detail.html?persid=79969) He has graduated 41 PhDs serving at leading industrial and academic institutions today. His research centers on aerosol dynamics and has been recognized by the Whitby, Smoluchowski and Fuchs awards while he is a member of the Swiss Academy of Engineering.
Email: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch

 

TS11

Dynamic modeling of PM transport and deposition in human respiratory systems


Abstract: Dynamic modeling of how particulate matters (PMs) transport and deposit in human respiratory systems due to indoor exposures is important for case-specific lung dosimetry predictions and occupational health analysis. Indeed, it used to be difficult to provide the high-resolution data for the researcher to understand the particle dynamics in human lung airways quantitatively and to evaluate the connections among realistic exposure levels, lung uptakes, and health effects. Such deficiencies are due to the invasive nature and imaging limitations of existing in vitro and in vivo studies. Additionally, the complexity of pre-existing lung diseases and breathing patterns make the personalized exposure health risk assessment even more challenging. However, the development of fluid dynamics, computational science, and medical imaging disciplines has spawned a new flourishing interdisciplinary research field in modeling the transport, deposition, and translocation of airborne PMs from the indoor environment to human respiratory systems. As an alternative, such models, i.e., computational fluid-particle dynamics (CFPD) models can quantify transport phenomena in respiratory systems. This tutorial will provide an overview of how to use CFPD based multiscale numerical approaches to predict the indoor PM lung dosimetry quantitatively. We will start with reviewing the past ten years of computational lung aerosol dynamics work and current challenges and research progress on modeling that are available. We will then cover the fundamentals of how to build the CFPD model based on conservation laws to simulate airflow and airborne particle dynamics and enhance the fundamental understandings of the underlying mechanisms. Focusing on indoor aerosol simulations, we will discuss (a) how subject-specific respiratory system configurations can be reconstructed form CT/MRI scanned data, (b) how to build a virtual indoor environment and integrate the digital human system, (c) how to generate different types of finite volume meshes (including poly-core and poly-hex core meshes), (d) how to solve the governing equations numerically, and (e) how to sufficiently utilize the high-resolution CFPD data for post-processing with in-depth scientific insights. We will also cover the basics of physiologically based pharmacokinetic/toxicokinetic (PBPK/TK) models and discuss examples on how to connect the PBTK model with CFPD model to bring the lung dosimetry predictions to the health endpoints. Finally, we will introduce application examples of using dynamic models on indoor aerosol exposure assessments.

Yu Feng


Bio: Dr. Yu Feng is an Assistant Professor in the School of Chemical Engineering at Oklahoma State University. He is also a center investigator in the Oklahoma Center for Respiratory and Infectious Diseases (OCRID). Yu Feng was a Research Assistant Professor and Lab Manager of the Computational Multi-Physics Laboratory (CM-PL) at North Carolina State University. He has also held an affiliation with the DoD Biotechnology HPC Software Applications Institute (BHSAI) as a Research Scientist II. Dr. Feng’s lab focuses on making contributions to the medical world and human life by providing well-posed solutions to patient-specific pulmonary health problems using multi-scale modeling techniques. Outside of work, Dr. Yu Feng enjoys running (20 half marathons and 7 marathons so far) and hiking.
Email: yu.feng@okstate.edu

 

TS12

Hands-On Aerosol Instrumentation Design and Measurement – Group A


Abstract: This tutorial will enable the participants to get an "under the hood" look at a broad spectrum of currently available aerosol instruments, with focus on aerosol sampling and speciation instruments. Whether you are an experimentalist, modeler, or both, this is an opportunity to learn how fundamental aerosol science principles are used in actual aerosol measurement technologies. Key capabilities, as well as limitations, of each technique will be described in order to instill a better appreciation of what different instruments can and cannot do. In this session, five aerosol instrumentation suppliers will present the concepts and engineering design processes that led to the successful development of different aerosol instruments. The tutorial is not a marketing and sales opportunity for participating vendors; this is an education session with an emphasis entirely on technology and the key physical concepts employed by the instruments. The goal is that by the end of the tutorial, participants no longer consider the instruments a "black box," but rather have some understanding of the principles and design consideration that went into the development of the various instruments. Furthermore, the information presented on measurement uncertainties and limitations will help the participants better interpret (avoid over-interpreting) measurement results.

Participating Companies


Aethlabs – microAeth MA Series
Magee Scientific – Total carbon analyzer
Innova Prep – ACD – 200 Bobcat Air Collector
Aerosol Devices – BioSpot bioaerosol sampler
URG Corp – Ambient Ion Monitor

 

Session 4: 3:00 PM - 4:40 PM

TS13

Teaching Aerosol Science to Undergraduate Students


Abstract: Aerosol education, or even simple awareness of aerosols, typically begins in graduate school where many students find an interest in the topic simply by accident. This is unfortunate for the discipline of aerosol studies, the schools with graduate programs in the area, and the undergraduate students who never learn about the topic. One reason for this, is that aerosol studies span many different majors/areas including Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Atmospheric Science, Human Health Studies, and Earth Sciences. Because of their relatively minor role in most of these individual areas, aerosols never get the position of a “required” course in any curriculum, and rarely even get the position of “elective” in most disciplines. Despite this, they remain an underlying “enabling discipline” for important work in all of these majors/areas mastered only by specialists who earn graduate degrees and hidden from the view of both the general public and often many other science and engineering professionals who remain unaware of the importance, opportunities, and problems associated with aerosols. The goal of this tutorial is to demonstrate and discuss several ways that those involved in undergraduate education can begin to introduce aerosols into the undergraduate curriculum. Since many aerosol processes already involve principle concepts from chemistry, physics, thermodynamics, mass transfer, fluid dynamics, diffusion, and other topical classes, and since many applications involve the use of aerosols (spray drying, powder coating, drug delivery, manufacturing, fuel combustion, pollution mitigation, epidemiology, etc.), there are myriad opportunities to bring aerosols to many undergraduate classes in many disciplines. This tutorial will show some examples using case studies, class problems, demonstrations, etc. that have already been used in undergraduate curricula. Additionally, time will be reserved in the second half of the tutorial to actively engaging the audience to develop their own aerosol-related modules/problems/examples/case studies and then to share these (or ones previously developed) with the rest of the participants. All examples will be shared electronically with the tutorial participants and, hopefully, be disseminated more widely via free academic access sites in the near future.

Tim Raymond


Bio: Tim Raymond is Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Bucknell University in Lewisburg. He earned his BS in Chemical Engineering from Bucknell and his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University where he worked in the Pandis research labs, currently the Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies. Tim has been a member of AAAR for 20 years, attending and presenting at all but one conference, and has served the organization as Atmospheric Aerosol Working Group Chair, on the Awards Committee and on the Education Committee for several years. Tim is a current member of the Board of Directors of AAAR. His interests in aerosols encompass Aerosol Chemistry, Aerosol Physics, Atmospheric Aerosols, Health-Related Aerosols, and Indoor Aerosols & Aerosol Exposure. His past work as an NSF CAREER Awardee primarily involved aerosol-water interactions in the atmosphere with a focus on cloud condensation nuclei and complex, organic aerosols. Recently Tim’s research has expanded to investigations of biologically-sourced aerosols and aerosols formed from electronic cigarettes. As a member of the AAAR Board of Directors, Tim would like to improve the visibility and reputation of aerosol studies as an “enabling discipline” among both the general public and other scientific and engineering research disciplines. With his background and position in undergraduate engineering education, Tim works to expose more undergraduates, particularly at non-PhD-granting institutions and those without active aerosol researchers, to the exciting possibilities and connections of aerosols to the environment, human health, energy, etc. Tim recently organized the Aerosol Education symposium at the International Aerosol Conference in St. Louis last year.
Email: traymond@bucknell.edu

 

TS14

Electrostatic precipitation


Abstract: Charging and manipulation of particles has been essential to the development of fast particle size classification and high throughput particle collection and gas cleaning. This tutorial will provide an overview of particle charging fundamentals and how they influence electrostatic precipitation. Important ancillary phenomena affecting particle collection rate and overall collection efficiency will be discussed, along with several novel or niche applications that rely on charged aerosol dynamics.

Herek Clack


Bio: Herek Clack earned an S.B. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from MIT (1987) and an M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (1998) in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Previously an assistant, then associate, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology (1999-2014), currently he is a research associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan where his group focuses on electrostatic precipitation, electro-hydrodynamic phenomena, and inactivation of infectious aerosols by application of non-thermal plasmas. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees addressing issues ranging from the environmental implications of changing power plant regulations to assessing technologies for reducing air emissions from the thermal destruction of both conventional munitions and chemical warfare agents by the DoD. He has received the XVI Distinguished Young Alumni/ae award (MIT, 2000), the CAREER Award (NSF, 2004), the Harry J. White Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Science and Application of Electrostatic Precipitation (ISESP, 2013) and the University of Michigan College of Engineering Kenneth M. Reese Outstanding Research Scientist Award (2019). He is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Society for Electrostatic Precipitation (ISESP).
Email: hclack@umich.edu

 

TS15

Inhalation Delivery Study (Design and Results)


Abstract: Inhaled aerosol can be friend or foe depending on the type of aerosol. While urban dust or occupational aerosols are under scrutiny for public health risks, inhaled drugs alleviate symptoms of numerous patients suffering from chronic lung disease. Both aspects of inhaled aerosols are widely studied leveraging in vitro (cell) and in vivo (animal) models of the lung. In particular accurate dose-response curves are essential for risk or efficacy assessment. In this tutorial you will learn about various in vitro and in vivo aerosol exposure technologies with particular emphasis on control of the tissue-delivered dose. An overview of the currently available in vitro aerosol exposure systems is provided and two systems are presented in more detail: the VITROCELL®CLOUD system and the Electrostatic Aerosol in Vitro Exposure System (EAVES). Both were developed for ease-of-use combined with high substance efficiency and dose delivery rate. Moreover, two types of in vivo (animal) aerosol exposure technologies are presented, the conventional nose-only and the recently developed ventilator-assisted aerosol inhalation system featuring high delivery efficiency and dose rate. Technological details, study design and selected results for all of these aerosol exposure systems are presented.

Krystal Pollitt


Bio: Krystal Pollitt is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at Yale University. She received her Ph.D. from King’s College London in Environmental Toxicology. She holds Bachelor and Master degrees in Chemical Engineering from the University of Toronto. Her research includes ambient aerosol chemical characterisation and evaluation of the health effects associated with exposure. She has experience performing human and animal aerosol inhalation studies as well as dose-controlled aerosol exposures using ex vivo models of the lung.
Email: krystal.pollitt@yale.edu

Otmar Schmid


Bio: Dr. Otmar Schmid is head of the Pulmonary Aerosol Delivery Group at the Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Munich, Germany), and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. His current research interests range from health risks of ambient aerosols, cigarette smoke and engineered nanomaterials to new opportunities for diagnostics and targeted drug delivery using nanomaterials. He has extensive experience in aerosol characterization and has developed patented methods for dose-controlled delivery of aerosols to animal models and cell culture models of the lung. He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, he has served on the boards of numerous professional associations, and he has served as consultant to pharma industry and regulatory bodies.
Email: otmar.schmid@helmholtz-muenchen.de

 

TS16

Hands-On Aerosol Instrumentation Design and Measurement – Group B


Abstract: This tutorial will enable the participants to get an "under the hood" look at a broad spectrum of currently available aerosol instruments, with focus on aerosol sizing and counting instruments. Whether you are an experimentalist, modeler, or both, this is an opportunity to learn how fundamental aerosol science principles are used in actual aerosol measurement technologies. Key capabilities, as well as limitations, of each technique will be described in order to instill a better appreciation of what different instruments can and cannot do. In this session, six aerosol instrumentation suppliers will present the concepts and engineering design processes that led to the successful development of different aerosol instruments. The tutorial is not a marketing and sales opportunity for participating vendors; this is an education session with an emphasis entirely on technology and the key physical concepts employed by the instruments. The goal is that by the end of the tutorial, participants no longer consider the instruments a "black box," but rather have some understanding of the principles and design consideration that went into the development of the various instruments. Furthermore, the information presented on measurement uncertainties and limitations will help the participants better interpret (avoid over-interpreting) measurement results.

Participating Companies


Palas GmbH – U-SMPS and Charme
Dekati – High Resolution ELPI®+ with sintered collection plates
Cambustion – AAC (Aerodynamic Aerosol Classifier)
Brechtel Mtg. – Portable UAV/Drone deployable sizing and counting instruments
AirPhoton LLC – nephelometer model IN102Ex
TSI Inc. – 3789 Versatile Water-Based Condensation Particle Counter

 

Dates to Remember

July 19, 2019
Early Bird Registration Deadline
Late Breaking Poster Abstract Deadline

September 19/September 23, 2019
Hotel Sleeping Room Reservation Cut-off (Two Hotel Options)

October 14-18, 2019
AAAR 37th Annual Conference

 

Code of Conduct

 
 
 
 

Location

Oregon Convention Center
777 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.
Portland, OR 97232

Hotels

Doubletree By Hilton
1000 NE Multnomah Street
Portland, OR 97232

Quality Inn Downtown Convention Center
431 NE Multnomah Street
Portland, OR 97232

 
 
 
 
 
 

Conference Registration Fees
Registration
Categories
Early Bird
Received By
July 19, 2019
Advance
Received Between
July 20 and
August 12, 2019
On-Site
Received After
August 12, 2019
Regular $609 $699 $792
Early Career $481 $552 $621
Retiree $185 $185 $276
Student $185 $185 $276

One-day registrations are also available. Click here for more information.